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By Franz Rothenbacher, 2006
 
This document aims to analize differents types of families in Europe. Conclusions:
  • Extended family was the dominant model in history only in normative, but not in quantitative terms. Principle of shared property, but only one heir of the family property
  • Quantitatively the nuclear family dominated. Causes: Low life expectancy which made a family of 3 generations a seldom phenomenon; principle of neolocality and shared property transfer
  • The extended family died out in the sense of living together under one roof

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Eurostat, European Commission, 2011

This publication looks at a broad range of characteristics of migrants living in the European Union and EFTA countries. It looks separately at the foreign-born, the foreign citizens, and the second generation. It addresses a variety of aspects of the socio-economic situation of migrants including labour market situation, income distribution, and poverty. The effects of different migration-related factors (i.e. reason of migration, length of residence) are examined. The situation of migrants is compared to that of the non-migrant reference population.

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Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency, European Commission, 2012.

Key Data on Education in Europe makes a valuable contribution to the debate on education policy at both European and national level and helps to monitor progress on the strategic framework. Based on data collected through the Eurydice network, Eurostat and the PISA international survey, the report provides standardised and readily comparable quantitative and qualitative indicators which offer a wide-ranging overview of the organisation and functioning of European education systems. It examines in particular areas of special importance for European cooperation – such as participation in compulsory education, tertiary education attainment and transition to the labour market, investment in education and quality assurance – and thus provides an insight into the ways in which countries are responding to common challenges in education.

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Eurostat - European Commission, 2011

Statistics on culture cover many aspects of economic and social life. With the adoption of the Europe 2020 strategy, a policy approach that will help Europe find innovative solutions to current challenges, it is more than ever essential to underline the importance of culture in the European Union’s objective of smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. Against this background, cultural statistics can serve to support the growing interest of policy-makers in culture and its role in society, the economy and the cohesion of Europe.

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